UC Campus

Welcome to the Commitee on Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics click here to visit the UChicago homepage

Committee on Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics

KCBD Building

Welcome to the Commitee on Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics click here to visit the UChicago homepage

Committee on Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics

Welcome from the Chair, M. Eileen Dolan, PhD

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Thank you for your interest in the Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics Training Program at the University of Chicago.  This program offers rigorous training that combines research, didactic and clinical exposure in personalized therapeutics that pertains to any discipline of medicine.

We welcome individuals with an MD, MD/PhD, and/or PharmD degree who have completed a residency training and who are eligible for board certification in their selected specialty Those with a PhD are also consideredfor the program in a relevant discipline (i.e. Pharmacology, pharmacogenomics, genomics) and if they show a strong interest in translational or clinical research.

After a 2-year training period, trainees should be qualified to begin an independent research career in clinical pharmacology. In addition, fellows are eligible for board certification in Clinical Pharmacology.

Committee faculty are from many disciplines throughout the University and will provide trainees an environment for the exchange of ideas and resources across specialty or departmental lines.

We pride ourselves on the unique experience our trainees receive which is evident by our success rate of future scientists in the field of clinical pharmacology and pharmacogenomics.

 

Featured Fellow

Dr. David Arndt joined the Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics program in June of 2016 after completing his PhD in Experimental Psychology (Behavioral Neuroscience) from Kansas State University.  Currently, Dr. Arndt is working on several ongoing studies with Harriet de Wit, PhD, in the Human Behavioral Pharmacology Lab, investigating how drugs such as cannabidiol, d-amphetamine, or nicotine can affect behaviors and physiological responses. Dr. Arndt is also collecting data on a project with Dr. Mani Sharma, MD, trying to determine predictive factors underlying the development of anticipatory nausea and vomiting in patients receiving emetogenic chemotherapies.

 

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According to Dr. Arndt, “The fellowship has given me valuable experience in clinical research and exposure to clinical practice. The formal coursework, pharmacology consults, and IRB service have complemented the extensive hands-on training I receive through research projects. What I find most valuable about this program is the opportunity to work more independently than a traditional post-doc, allowing me to pursue several collaborative projects with experts from multiple therapeutic areas.